How to Merge Lists in Python

If you ever have multiple lists in Python that you want to combine in one list, don’t panic. Python actually makes it really easy to perform a function like this. You can combine and concatenate lists just by using the plus (+) symbol — seriously, it doesn’t get much easier than that. If you want […]

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Using Python’s Random Module to Generate Integers

In Python, the random module allows you to generate random integers. It’s often used when you need to a number to be picked at random or to pick a random element from a list. Using it is actually really straightforward. Let’s say you want to print a random integer within a given range, like 1-100. Here’s how […]

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Python Basics: Strings and Printing

Strings are a really commonly used type in Python, and can be formed simply by placing quotes around characters. Anything that resides inside of quotations is a string (single quotes or double quotes are both acceptable). To create a string, you simply need to assign these characters inside quotes as values to a variable, like this: […]

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Python While Loop

The while loop in Python is basically just a way to construct code that will keep repeating while a certain expression is true. To create a while loop, you’ll need a target statement and a condition, and the target statement is the code that will keep executing for as long as the condition remains true. The syntax […]

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Python’s Count Method

In Python, the count method returns the count of how many times an object occurs in a list. The syntax for the count method is really straightforward: list.count(obj) The above example represents the basic syntax for this method. When you’re using it in context, you’ll need to replace the ‘list’ keyword with the actual name […]

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Resetting the Recursion Limit

Python’s default recursion limit is 1000, meaning that Python won’t let a function call on itself more than 1000 times, which for most people is probably enough. The limit exists because allowing recursion to occur more than 1000 times doesn’t exactly make for lightweight code. If, however, you find yourself in need of a higher recursion […]

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Swapping Values in Python

Swapping the values of two variables in Python is actually a really simple task. Python makes it fairly easy to swap two values without a lot of bulky code or weird hacks. Check out how easy it is to swap two numbers with each other using the built in methods below: x, y = 33, […]

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How to Check for Anagrams In Python

In Python, there’s a fairly straightforward way to create a method that can be used to check strings against each other to see if the two strings are anagrams. Check out the function below to see the method in action — essentially it works by using the “==” comparison operator to see if the strings on […]

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Using Break and Continue Statements in Python

In Python, break statements are used to exit (or “break) a conditional loop that uses “for” or “while”. After the loop ends, the code will pick up from the line immediately following the break statement. Here’s an example: even_nums = (2, 4, 6) num_sum = 0 count = 0 for x in even_nums: num_sum = […]

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Quick Tip: Using Sets in Python

In Python, sets are lists that don’t contain any duplicate entries. Using the set type is a quick and easy way to make sure that a list doesn’t contain any duplicates. Here’s an example of how you would use it to check a list for duplicates: a = set([“Pizza”, “Ice Cream”, “Donuts”, “Pizza”]) print a […]

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